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Splenda refutes claims made by Italian researchers

Splenda refutes claims made by Italian researchers

In response to the safety rating of sucralose by the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), Heartland Food Products Group, the makers of SPLENDA Sweeteners, wants to set the record straight.

According to findings published in January edition of the International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health, an artificial sweetener, Splenda, could be linked with increased risk of leukemia. The study was led by Italian researchers.

The researchers found after taking high amount of sucralose, another name for Splenda, for lifetime, there were increased cases of malignant tumors and hematopoietic neoplasias in males. They said sucralose is approximately 600 times sweeter than sucrose and used in over 4,500 products. The artificial sweetener is made by chemically reacting sugar (sucrose) with chlorine, according to the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI).

The rating is based solely on one study of mice that was conducted by the Ramazzini Institute in Italy, published in the International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health, and does not reflect the collective body of scientific evidence proving the safety of sucralose.

On the other hand, the manufacturer stats that the group routinely conducts studies using an unconventional design and has been criticized for not following internationally-recognized safety assessment standards.

Collective scientific evidence strongly supports that sucralose is safe and does not cause cancer. Sucralose has been extensively researched, with more than 110 studies conducted over a 20-year period.

Splenda is commonly used alternative for sugar. It has been linked to higher risk of leukemia and other tumors by researchers in the latest study. The research team came to their findings after experimenting on Swiss mice. They tested Splenda on five groups of male and five groups of female mice. The mice then were given different amount of sucralose. The study team closely monitored mice after administering them regular dosage of sucralose.

Research indicates that one contributor to becoming overweight can be excess intake of added sugars. As a consequence, the current U.S. Dietary Guidelines, the World Health Organization and the American Heart Association have all recommended a reduction in average sugar consumption.

Artificial sweeteners have been linked with health risks in earlier studies as well. However, there have been contradicting studies about the risks associated with sweeteners.

Splenda refutes claims made by Italian researchers